Debian and Ubuntu: Debian LTS, Debian 9.4, Zstd and More

  • Debian LTS work, February 2018

    I was assigned 15 hours of work by Freexian’s Debian LTS initiative and worked 13 hours. I will carry over 2 hours to March.

    I made another release on the Linux 3.2 longterm stable branch (3.2.99) and started the review cycle for the next update (3.2.100). I rebased the Debian package onto 3.2.99 but didn’t upload an update to Debian this month.

  • Debian 9.4 Stretch GNU/Linux Released With 150+ Fixes: Update Now

    One of the great things about using a popular Linux distro is that you keep getting timely upgrades, which ensure that you’re running a secure operating system. The same holds true for Debian GNU/Linux, whose development team keeps offering regular updates. Just a couple of days ago, the team pushed the fourth point release of Debian 9 “stretch.”

    For those who don’t know, Debian 9.0 series is an LTS edition, and it’ll remain supported for the next five years.

  • Debian GNU/Linux 9.4 “Stretch” Point Release Brings More Than 70 Security Fixes

    The Debian Project announced over the weekend the release of the fourth maintenance update to the stable Debian GNU/Linux 9 “Stretch” operating system series.

    Debian GNU/Linux 9.4 “Stretch” comes three months after the 9.3 point release and brings more than 70 security fixes and 89 miscellaneous bugfixes for various core components or other packages available in the main software repositories of the Linux-based operating system. However, the Debian Project warns that this point release doesn’t represent a new version of Debian Stretch.

    “This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available. Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included,” reads the release announcement.

  • Debian 9.4 released
  • Ubuntu Installs Made 10% Faster Using Facebook Tech

    If you long to install Ubuntu a little bit faster help it at hand thanks to some nifty open-source tech developed by Facebook.

    Using Zstandard (zstd), a ‘lossless data compression algorithm’ developed by Facebook, Ubuntu developers have been able to speed up Ubuntu installs by 10%.

    While Zstd is primarily designed for use in “real-time compression scenarios” it is able to unpack packages during an Ubuntu install faster than current compression tools Xz and Gzip do.

  • Canonical Working On Zstd-Compressed Debian Packages For Ubuntu

    Support for Zstd-compressed Debian packages was worked on last week by some Canonical/Ubuntu developers and already by the end of the year they are looking at potentially using it by default.

    Zstd is the compression algorithm out of Facebook that has been attracting a fair amount of interest in the Linux/open-source space due to its higher decompression speeds that can trump XZ or Gzip.

  • Keeping Governance Simple and Uncomplicated

    We did this in Ubuntu. We started with some core governance boards (the Community Council, focused on community policy and the Technical Council focused on technical policy). The rest of the extensive governance structure came as Ubuntu grew significantly. Our goal was always to keep things as lightweight as possible.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Beta 1 Released for Participating Flavors

    Ahoy, Beavers! The first beta builds of the Ubuntu 18.04 release cycle have been released and are available to download.

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