Coding: Python 3.0, Java EE, and Licence Compliance

  • A Look Back At Python 3.0 After 10 Years

    This year marks one decade since the release of Python 3. Red Hat’s Victor Stinner who is also a CPython core developer provided a retrospective on Python 3 at last week’s FOSDEM conference.

    It’s been 10 years since Python 3 came about with its language changes and in 2018, there are still programs being made compatible with Python 3. Python 2.7 continues to be maintained until 2020.

  • Due to Oracle being Oracle, Eclipse holds poll to rename Java EE (No, it won’t be Java McJava Face)

    Unable to convince Oracle to allow the use of its trademarked term “Java” to refer to the open source version of Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE), the Eclipse Foundation is asking those who care about such things to vote on proposed names for the software project.

    Last summer, Oracle said it had begun working with the Eclipse Foundation and the Java EE community to transfer its Java EE code and governance responsibilities to the foundation.

    But Oracle is not giving up its intellectual property rights in the name “Java.” And so for the past few months, the Java EE community has been puzzling over how to refer to the open source version of Java EE.

  • Open Source Audits in Merger and Acquisition Transactions: Get the Free Ebook

    Haddad also notes that open source audits can expose obligations. “Open source licenses usually impose certain obligations that must be fulfilled when code is distributed,” he notes. “One example is the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL), which requires derivatives or combinations to be made available under the same license as well. Other licenses require certain notices in documentation or have restrictions for how the product is promoted.”

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