Security: The Internet of Connected Sex Toys, Gas Stations, Hospitals With Windows and More

  • The Internet of Connected Sex Toys is every bit as horrifyingly insecure and poorly thought out as you imagine

    The rush to put networked sensors and controllers into sex toys is grounded in foolish, convenient untruths, like the idea that the incredibly sensitive data generated by these systems can be anonymized and then analyzed for insights without exposing users to risk.

    The sex tech industry has been a top-to-bottom series of farces and catastrophes. […]

  • These app-controlled sex toys can be ‘remotely taken over by hackers’

    In an advisory published Thursday (1 January), researchers said bugs in a customer database meant that attackers could have easily accessed user details, including “names, cleartext passwords and explicit image galleries” being stored by the company.

  • Flaws in Gas Station Software Let Hackers Change Prices, Steal Fuel, Erase Evidence

    Gas stations lose millions of dollars annually to gas fraud. Most of this fraud occurs when thieves use stolen credit and debit cards to fuel vehicles, resulting in chargebacks to service stations.

    But gas station owners in the US and elsewhere may have to worry about a new kind of fraud after two security researchers in Israel discovered multiple vulnerabilities in one automated system used to control fuel prices and other information at thousands of gas stations around the world.

    The vulnerabilities would allow an attacker to shut down fuel pumps, hijack credit card payments, and steal card numbers or access backend networks to take control of surveillance cameras and other systems connected to a gas station or convenience store’s network. An attacker could also simply alter fuel prices and steal petrol.

  • Healthcare IT Systems: Tempting Targets for Ransomware

    Well, there’s no use in waiting, I suppose. Two Thursdays ago, Chicago-based electronic health records provider Allscripts Healthcare Solutions suffered a ransomware attack that paralyzed some of its services. This past Friday, the company announced it had completely recovered from the cyberattack. But not before a class action lawsuit [pdf] was filed against it by an orthopedic non-surgery practice for failing to secure its systems and data from a well-known cybersecurity threat, i.e., a strain of SamSam.

    The ransomware attack impaired Allscripts’ data centers in Raleigh and Charlotte, North Carolina, affecting a number of applications, such as its Professional EHR and Electronic Prescriptions for Controlled Substances (EPCS) hosted services, which were mostly restored within five days, according to the company. Other services, like clinical decision support, analytics, data extraction, and regulatory reporting, took the longest to make operational again.

  • Pwn2Own 2018 Expands Targets and Raises Prize Pool to $2M

    The annual Pwn2own hacking competition run by Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) is set to return for 2018, along with a longer list of targets and more money for security researchers, than ever before.

    Pwn2own is a security researcher contest that typically has two events a year, with the primary event focused on browser and server technologies and a second event just for mobile technologies. The first event of 2018 is set for March 14-16 and will have five targets: virtualization, web browsers, enterprise applications, servers and a new Windows Insider Preview Challenge category.

  • Disable Flash Player!! Critical Vulnerability Gives Away Your System Controls

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